Standardized Tests

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SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test)

SAT is one of the most important parts of your college application. Starting from March 2016, the test is going to have some changes on the content. The test will be focusing on the knowledge, skills, and understandings that has identified as most important for college and career readiness and success; there will be a greater emphasis on the meaning of words in extended contexts and on how word choice shapes meaning, tone, and impact. The SAT will be held 6 times in Hong Kong each year, during October, November, December, January, May and June. For those who are 12 or above and would like to go to the states for college and universities, you are welcomed to take the test.

 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT, is perhaps the most well-known college preparation test among today’s high school students. Preparing for and taking the test can be quite stressful. We are here to help students prepare for the test and feel confident about themselves, so come and join our classes! 

Please click on the [small banner] on the left item column for class schedule and registration form.

about SAT 

SAT will test you in the following areas:

1. Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

                Reading Test

                Writing and Language Test

2. Math

3. Essay (optional)

 

SAT consists of 3 sections (one of which is optional):

Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

                     Reading Test

                    •Time Limit: 65 minutes

                    •Content: 1 passage from a classic or contemporary work of US or world literature; 1 passage or a pair of passages from either                                     a US founding document or a text in the great global conversation they inspired. The US Constitution or a speech by                                     Nelson Mandela, for example; 1 selection about economics, psychology, sociology, or some other social science; 2                                      science passages that examine foundational concepts and developments in Earth science, biology, chemistry, or                                           physics

                    •Questions: 52 questions 

 

                     Writing and Language Test

                     •Time Limit: 35 minutes

                     •Content: To answer some questions, you’ll need to look closely at a single sentence. Others require reading the entire piece                                        and interpreting a graphic. For instance, you might be asked to choose a sentence that corrects a misinterpretation                                        of a scientific chart or that better explains the importance of the data. The passages you improve will range from                                            arguments to nonfiction narratives and will be about careers, history, social studies, the humanities, and science.

                    •Questions: 44 questions

 

Math

          •Time Limit: 80 minutes

          •Content: Heart of Algebra (focuses on the mastery of linear equations and systems), Problem Solving and Data Analysis (about being                           quantitatively literate); Passport to Advanced Math (features questions that require the manipulation of complex                                             equations); Additional Topics in Math (geometry and trigonometry)

          •Questions: 58 questions

 

Essay

          •Time Limit: 50 minutes

          •Content:

          The prompt (question) shown below, or a nearly identical one, is used every time the new SAT is given.

          As you read the passage below, consider how [the author] uses evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims.

          -       evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims.

          -       reasoning to develop ideas and to connect claims and evidence.

          -       stylistic or persuasive elements, such as word choice or appeals to emotion, to add power to the ideas expressed.

         Write an essay in which you explain how [the author] builds an argument to persuade [his/her] audience that [author’s claim]. In                      your essay, analyze how [the author] uses one or more of the features listed above (or features of your own choice) to strengthen the               logic and persuasiveness of [his/her] argument. Be sure that your analysis focuses on the most relevant features of the passage. Your           essay should not explain whether you agree with [the author’s] claims, but rather explain how the author builds an argument to                       persuade [his/her] audience.

         •Questions: 1 question

 

Approximate test duration: 3 hours (with the optional essay,total duration: 3 hours 50 minutes)

 

Total Score: 1600 (800 for each section); optional essay: 8

*For the New SAT, there will be NO score deduction for wrong answers

 

Source:

https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat

 

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